Public Forum Debate 2021-2022 Potential Topic Areas & Resolutions

The Public Forum Wording committee has developed a variety of potential resolutions for the 2021-2022 season. Member students and one chapter advisor per active school will vote for each topic one week prior to the topic release date. Topic voting for the September/October topic opens August 1.

2021 September/October – Europe

  • Resolved: The North Atlantic Treaty Organization should substantially increase its defense commitments to the Baltic states.
  • Resolved: The United States should substantially increase its economic engagement in the Western Balkans.

2021 November/December – Blockchain

  • Resolved: Increased United States federal regulation of cryptocurrency transactions and/or assets will produce more benefits than harms.
  • Resolved: The United States federal government should implement a central bank digital currency.

2022 January – U.S. Drug Policy

  • Resolved: The United States federal government should legalize all illicit drugs.
  • Resolved: In the United States, the benefits of drug courts outweigh the harms.

2022 February – International Organizations

  • Resolved: The United Nations should admit the Republic of Somaliland as a member state.
  • Resolved: On balance, Turkey’s membership is beneficial to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

2022 March – Sustainability

  • Resolved: The United States should substantially increase its investment in carbon capture technology.
  • Resolved: In the United States, the benefits of increasing organic agriculture outweigh the harms.

2022 April – East Asia

  • Resolved: The People’s Republic of China should substantially decrease its control of state-owned enterprises.
  • Resolved: Japan should revise Article 9 of its Constitution to develop offensive military capabilities.

2022 National Tournament – Trade

  • Resolved: The United States should establish a comprehensive bilateral trade agreement with Taiwan.
  • Resolved: On balance, the benefits of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership outweigh the harms.